Good Luck with Those Development Plans!

While I have your attention, let’s (not) talk about what makes a good development plan.

After years of working with executives, the question of what goes into a good development plan frequently comes up and can be a frustrating one for two reasons: the first is that there are as many options for good development plans as there are leaders; second, and most important, is that it’s the wrong question to be asking.

Is Your Succession Planning Process “All Ornaments and No Tree?”

I work with a CHRO who once described her company’s succession planning process as “all ornaments and no tree.” On the surface, her feedback might seem somewhat surprising. After all, the company conducted biannual talent management roundtables during which its top 200 or so leaders (and their viability as possible successors for enterprise-critical roles) were discussed in detail.

Succession Planning for 21st Century Talent: Part 1

Your mission, should you decide to accept it, is predicting and developing 21st century talent. As always, should you or any of your team fail, the C-suite will disavow any knowledge of your actions. This article will self-destruct in two minutes.

So, you take on the mission. Driving this course is not going to be easy. It will involve making turns at speed, accelerating fast, and at times stopping dead in your tracks. All without the wheels falling off.

Succession planning is a fluid and dynamic state

Leverage Your Company’s Pivotal Talent to Maximize the Impact on Results

When the countdown to the new fiscal year begins, companies take a hard look at next year’s spend and carefully allocate resources to people development.

They identify gaps in the talent pipeline and carefully consider possibilities, and before you know it, they have focused their attention and investment on the high-potential (HiPo) talent.

Sound familiar? Absolutely!

Sound good? Not necessarily—and here’s why.

Setting a High Bar for Transformation

The conversation in the chairman’s office was serious. Sitting in high-backed leather seats around a highly polished table, we talked about the readiness or not of the business to change. The chairman was concerned, and indeed a little worried. 

Rather colorfully, he set the scene. “We’ve had the best mousetrap in the business for 57 years and achieved growth and outstanding levels of profitability. The landscape has changed, and we’ve been too slow to respond. As a result, I’m not sure I’ve got the right people to make the journey.”

Working in Fear: Moving from Uncertainty Toward Trust

Corporate environments are often defined by an inherently competitive environment where clarity on how to be successful becomes increasingly more difficult and information becomes increasingly scarce as employees climb to higher levels. Leaders find themselves lacking critical conversations and are left with unanswered questions about how to navigate their careers. Even in the most rich and open-feedback cultures, employees often live in ambiguity.

Finding The Hidden Talent in Your Organization

Executives tend to have a few key attributes they look for in the next generation of leaders that signal a promise of greater things to come. The executives then become energetic advocates for individuals demonstrating these aspects; they write glowing performance reviews and do what they can to ensure these early stars are in the forefront when promotion decisions are made. Usually, these prized attributes represent a subset of the competencies identified in their organizations’ talent models and constitute a trusted shortcut for busy, experienced executives.

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